Background

How to Kitefish

For many years kite fishing in South Africa used to consist of a bait connected to float, being pulled into the sea by a kite. Wind that blows into the sea, called offshore wind, was needed for this to work, and offshore wind is not a common wind direction at most coastlines.

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The Seagull kite by Mullers' Kitefishing can be adjusted to fly to either side of the wind direction. This is done in a similar way to a stunt-kite or kitesurfing kite, but the kite is still stable and flies on only one kite-line. Our kites easily gets to 70° to the side of the wind direction.

If you do not have a kite-ferry, you can use the Seagull kite on its own to take your bait in, but you will probably need a frind to help you so that one of you can hold the kite and one can hold the fishing rod/line.

If you get a kite ferry as well, then you can leave the kite flying like a regular kite, and use the ferry to take your bait out to sea in a very short time. The kite ferry runs along the kite line like a cable car, takes your bait into the sea, and then reurns back along the kiteline so that you can drop off more fishing lines.

Please see the FAQ section for more information about kitefishing.